Mommy a.k.a. Short-Order Cook

What does family dinner look like in your home?

Do you sit at a table or in front of the television?  Do you all eat the same meal?

My idea of a successful family dinner has changed since becoming a parent.  And it’s my son who has taught me that what is on each of our plates isn’t nearly as important as what is happening at the table during our family dinner time.

Click here to be re-directed to parents.com to read my personal essay, “Choosing Peace over Peas.”  My essay was written in response to a Parents-sponsored essay contest, with a 300-word limit on the theme, “”The Parent I Thought I’d Be.”  I was a finalist and won a $100 gift card!

 

My Confession About Being a Stay-at-Home Mom

In my 4th grade classroom, preparing for Back-to-School Night. 2006

I have a confession to make.  I never planned on being a stay-at-home mom.  I was a teacher before my son was born, and I planned on being a teacher after my son was born.

At least, that was my plan.

But for those of you who read my blog and know me, plans started to change in 2010 when I became ill.  They really changed in 2013 when I retired from my twelve-year teaching career. 

There is a lot to read about the difficult decision to become a stay-at-home mom or the equally-difficult decision to return to the workplace.  But I didn’t find a lot to read about moms who become stay-at-home moms when it wasn’t their choice.  And as much as I love my son, as much as I feel lucky to take him to school each day and pick him up each afternoon, being a stay-at-home mom wasn’t my choice.

You can click here to be re-directed to mother.ly and read my recently published essay, “I Never Planned To Be a SAHM – To Be Honest, I’m Still Adjusting.”

 

Proudly Under-Scheduled

Time for the important things — a game of basketball between father and son

When you Google “Overscheduled children,” more than 200,000 results show up.  If you’re not familiar with the term, it applies to children who are spending most of their waking hours in school and involved in organized activities (such as enrichment classes, sports teams, and lessons). 

I’m proud to say that my son is not an “overscheduled” child.  He’s a ten-year-old fifth-grader who goes to school until 2:30 pm (1:30 pm on Tuesdays), and then spends the rest of the afternoon at home doing homework, playing, and relaxing (except on Tuesdays when we pay a visit to the public library). 

You can learn about our family’s decision not to have Ryan become an “overscheduled child” by clicking here and reading my recently published essay, “Why My Son Doesn’t Need ‘Enrichment’ Classes” at RoleReboot.

 

 

A Reminder to Practice Kindness

horoscope (photo by Wendy Kennar)

As I was reading the Sunday Los Angeles Times, I came across my horoscope.  I’ve found that sometimes my horoscope is rather general and could be applied to just about anyone.  Other times, I find my horoscope to be completely irrelevant to my life.  This week, I’d have to say my horoscope was spot on.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20):  Of course you deserve

your own kindness.  If you’re still struggling with that

it’s a good day to simply drop the fight.  Assume that

one of the main things you need right now is

more compassion and then give it to yourself.

Along those lines, I’d also like to share a post I wrote that MomsLA.com published last week.  Here’s the link to “Why I Don’t Volunteer to Chaperone My Son’s Field Trips”:

http://momsla.com/dont-volunteer-chaperone-sons-field-trips/